Meet BlueCart

Ah, BlueCart. BlueCart + Pelonkey. A friendship lovechild of the magical fairyland that is SXSW via Nicole & Andrew’s chance meeting. Two chatty folks who, well, chatted until they were the best of startup friends. They realized there are a lot of ways we could cross-market, and so this blog feature was born. Ok, some other stuff happened in there, too, because both companies are mega-busy, but you get the idea.

BlueCart & Pelonkey swapped Q’s, and below are one half of the A’s. A cool group of people with a cool mission. I’ll let them tell you what they do.vendor2.0What is BlueCart?

BlueCart is a communication platform for the hospitality industry. Our app streamlines the ordering process between restaurants and their suppliers so that a restaurant can place orders to all their different vendors (produce, meat, alcohol, seafood, linens, etc.) in just one click. Suppliers then get those orders automatically organized on the other side, and everyone sees the whole thing go down in real time. It’s a huge leap forward from managing orders via text messages, emails, and phone calls, and best of all, it’s free.

How long have you been around?

BlueCart first launched in July 2014.

How big is your team?

We’re 27 stunning colleagues strong.

Team

Who can benefit from signing up with you?

Really anyone who handles orders in the hospitality industry and has access to a computer or smartphone can use BlueCart. That’s the beautiful thing about the app, it’s incredibly simple and easy to get the hang of. Anyone from huge restaurant groups in NYC to a small farmer in Kansas can use BlueCart to simplify their ordering. We believe that everyone in this industry, no matter how big or small, should have access to technology that makes their lives easier by making their business run more smoothly. [Us, too!]

What makes you unique?

Hmm. There are many things that make us unique. One of the ways we’re unique is our approach to customer service. Literally everyone is a customer service rep at BlueCart. We make quarterly calls to all our clients to gain feedback and see if we can help with any problems. We’re still young and agile enough that we can make changes to the app based on the feedback we get. Everyone makes those calls, too, from our CEO to our interns. [Hearing from an actual person makes a big difference. Especially when that person is the CEO? Talk about quality assurance.]

If we were to walk in to the BlueCart HQ/office what are the first three things we would notice?

Hmm, that’s a great question. If you would have asked me a month ago, I would have said the ping pong table. But that’s a little cliché for a startup, and honestly we had to get rid of ours anyway because we are growing so quickly. So, to answer your question, one of the first things you would see is the coatrack where a fake wolf’s head sits on top of a hoodie that hasn’t left since Christian wore it for Halloween. After the big bad wolf, you would most likely see a portrait of Chester (a photo of a squirrel dressed up in a turtleneck), which for no reason at all is on our award shelf – and next to that, either because of or in spite of Chester, depending on your perspective, is our award for coolest DC company. [Definitely because of. Can we get a copy?]

Where are you located?

We started in D.C., and now have permanent offices in San Francisco and NYC, with staff in Austin.

What events do you have coming up?

We’re actually hosting an event on menu engineering and how to get the most profits out of your menu in early June. We have the master of menu design, Gregg Rapp, coming to share his tips on crafting a menu. He’s worked with some high-level, diverse clients like IHOP and the Kennedy Center. So, if you know anyone in the bay area that might be interested, let them know. It’s on June 6th and you can get tickets here. [It’s not too late!]

How can BlueCart help the events industry?

BlueCart can help in two ways. First, with logistics. BlueCart allows hotels hosting an event to order all their supplies including linens, silverware, and food all in one place. It’s kind of a one stop shop, but for ordering. Second, we can recommend some fantastic entertainment folks, like Pelonkey…

Food suppliers, food buyers, go check ’em out! With an easy-to-use interface and FREE access, why wouldn’t you want to take a gander?

We heart you, BlueCart.

 

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How Not to Use Social Media to Promote Your Gigs

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Step 1: Get only one unpopular, outdated social media account, and disregard the rest of them. Instagram, YouTube, Twitter? Forget those. You want Myspace. And Xanga.

Step 2: Design your username around something vague and unprofessional, not at all memorable or catchy. And definitely include numbers. Like “hunnybunny12” or “soccerstud478,” or anything else that would’ve sold big on AIM.

Step 3: Post on said platform vigorously for two days after signing up; share everything from your breakfast toast to your pedicure to the 12 bluejays on your birdfeeder: anything that isn’t remotely related to your profession.

Step 4: Go completely silent, and stop posting for the two weeks following your marathon.

Step 5: Get a gig! Forget to post about it.

Step 6: Decide on a random Sunday two months after creating your account to rebrand yourself, and then stop halfway because you get caught up watching cat videos, leaving your Myspace only partially completed (the part that says nothing about what you do, but rather focuses on your favorite mini cupcake flavor).

Step 7: Finally, finally, remember to snap pictures during your event to post later. Get home, and realize your camera was front facing the whole time and all you ended up with was a collection of double chins.

Step 8: When clients express interest in hiring you, scramble furiously to put together some sort of EPK in lieu of sharing your social media account that could’ve served its purpose if only you had remembered to use it. Mumble unintelligibly when they ask you what your Instagram profile is.

Step 9: Live this way for five years while wondering why you’ve never received a review besides those from your mom. Who wrote hers on Facebook, by the way.

Step 10: Realize your mom has more social media clout than you. Hang your head in shame.

Don’t let your mom win Facebook. Jump on the social media train already. Your wallet will thank you. And your mom will be proud.

#Tips on How to be a Great DJ #DJTips #PelonkeyDJs

We’ve been doing some research and gathering survey data from our awesome Pelonkey DJ pool, and here are some of the best tips we’ve compiled from the Pelonkey pros on how to really stand out as a performer and bring your DJ biz to the next level.

1. Always stay professional. By all means, have fun and be interactive with your client/crowd, but always be mindful and respectful of your surroundings and the people. Always maintain that excellent reputation for taking your art seriously.

2. Maintain composure, even in a stressful situation. There will be times where the equipment starts to malfunction, people with requests are up in arms about the music, etc. Just remember to keep calm, and look at the situation logically. This will help you be quick on your feet and let the negativity roll off your shoulders, ultimately producing a successful customer experience.

3. Keep the coals hot! In other words, don’t let your name fade – constantly be promoting your events and marketing yourself on your social media handles. Keep the most popular ones updated: Facebook (events, weekly line-up, cover photos, event flyers, tag your clients when appropriate to promote, etc.), Twitter (smart use of hashtags, similar to Facebook), Instagram (post your event flyers here as well as pics from the event, tagging places and people as much as possible). Link all these accounts to save yourself some time. Keep your professional profile on Linked In up to date as well – scored a big, high-end gig? List it as an achievement!

4. Be known in the industry. Go to other awesome DJ’s events, introduce yourself, snap a shot for Instagram, and make friends. These are great people to surround yourself with – not only are they into the same thing as you (music!), they vibe with all the people booking them and will help you become known (or for an experienced DJ, remain known) as awesome and worth hiring. These people are also your competition – learn from them. Constantly look for ways to boost your familiarity with the venues, promoters, events, and people in your industry. Never EVER put another DJ down.

5. Enjoy yourself! This is a fun lifestyle to rock, and your attitude about your DJing will reflect in your performance. So have fun, and don’t be afraid to try new things!

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Want to add some input? Feel free to comment or email Ciera@Pelonkey.com with your ideas!